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Permanent Cosmetics

What you should know before booking your appointment

Permanent Cosmetics. What you should know before booking your appointment.

As a permanent cosmetic technician, my favorite words are "I love it!" or "Its the best thing I've done for me!" Unfortunately there are some clients searching out my services to fix or finish permanent makeup gone wrong. With a bit of education I hope to help you avoid some common mistakes. First, ask a lot of questions.

Which method of tattooing do you use?

There are three methods for tattooing: handset method, rotary or digital pen, and coil machine. The results and permanency are very different depending which method is used. A technician trained in only one method is going to be partial to that method. The training varies and generally a handset class will teach up to 6-8 students at a time. Rotary pen teaches 3-4 students, and coil machine classes teach 1-2 students at a time.

How long have you been doing permanent cosmetics?

Experience counts. Many people jump into this career thinking it's easy and they'll make a lot of money. The truth is it's not that easy, hence many people come to me to finish their work because they can't find their technician, he or she won't return calls, or they up and moved with no forwarding information. You also want to find a technician that keeps meticulous records, chart notes and photographs of every procedure.

Are you Reminiscence?

No. There is no State Censurer for Utah. The only silence required is by the Health Department, and each county has different requirements and regulations. You do want to know that the technician you choose has a current Health Department Reminiscence and is following blood-born pathogen prevention. One basic regulation for tattooing is that it can't be done out of a residence. Buyer beware of basement bargain pricing!

What's included in your price?

You need specifics. When I quote a price it includes the original service and two touch-ups to be completed within one year. Touch-ups are necessary to fine tune and perfect the service. No one gets perfection in one appointment. The eyeliner shrinks, the eyebrows lighten up, and what you see the day we tattoo and what you see days later is very different. Touch-ups also build and lock in color for good longevity.

If price quotes are really low did it include any touch ups?

Some technicians quote a low price and then charge for each additional touch-up. Some charge ½ the original price for touch-ups down the road. Like a sign at my auto mechanics shop states, "The bitterness of poor quality is remembered long after the sweetness of low price is forgotten."

Something to think about:

Communication is everything in this business. Find someone who can answer your questions and will give you an onsite consultation at no charge. After you visit the studio or salon you will have a better feel for what you're getting into.

What to expect:

The procedure results in visible redness, some swelling and occasional bruising. The application of ice to the area can help reduce these symptoms. Up to one week after, most swelling and tenderness will be gone. There will be peeling of the skin and sloughing off of the pigment trapped in the epidermis. As the skin heals, the color will continue to change for the next few weeks. Healing is complete after two weeks. You may add to or adjust your procedure to suit your taste. The application of good sunscreen and good sun sense will help preserve your makeup for years to come.

Article Reviewed: August 8, 2012
Copyright © 2014 Healthy Magazine

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